Skip to content

550 Classic Fluxus Performance Scores

Hey kids! Get your gang together and have your very own Instant Fluxfest!

Just download the incredible Fluxus Performance Workbook and get busy performing the scores that have entertained and enlightened generations of Fluxus enthusiasts round the world.

The Fluxus Performance Workbook. It's Free! Get yours today!

Download it now (PDF)

The Fluxus Performance Workbook. Edited by Ken Friedman, Owen Smith, Lauren Sawchyn
The Fluxus Performance Workbook. Get yours today!

 

The Fluxlist in 2018 is as busy as it ever has been since its founding in 1996 by Fluxus co-founder Dick Higgins and friends. Some of whom (like Allen Bukoff) remain active on the list to this day.

Where will you find The Fluxlist today?

Facebook Group
(Most of the interactivity for which the intermedia group is famous happens here)

Yahoo Mail Group
(The email list continuation of the original 1996 listserv)

Twitter @The_Fluxlist

The Fluxlist Blog on Blogspot

On the Web @ the-fluxlist.com

John M. Bennett John M. Bennett has been (and continues to be) a prolific author and publisher of avant garde poetry and experimental writing. He is an active and inspirational member of the contemporary Fluxus community, and along with his wife, Cathy Mehrle Bennett, is also an active participant in the international network of mail artists.

Since 1974, Luna Bisonte Prods has published a wide variety of experimental, avant-garde, audio, and visual literature in a wide variety of formats by artists from all over the world. Among the authors and artists published are such major and emerging figures as Ivan Argüelles, Sheila E. Murphy, Jim Leftwich, Andrew Topel, Carlos M. Luis, Scott Helmes, Jake Berry, John M. Bennett, Susan Smith Nash, Al Ackerman, Bob Heman, Richard Kostelanetz, Charles Henri Ford, Dick Higgins, Robin Crozier, Peter Ganick, and many others.

LBP books are collected in major libraries and institutions, including The Museum of Modern Art, The Sackner Archive, Princeton University, SUNY Buffalo, The University of Wisconsin, Brown University, New York Public Library, Washington University, Ohio University, The Ohio State University, and many others.

Luna Bisonte books are available at Lulu.com

FLUXFEST CHICAGO 2017
Itinerary:

Fluxfest Chicago 2017 Poster

Thursday, May 25. Opening reception, connections… Don E Boyd and art networking. 4 to 7 PM, Joan Flasch artist book library, school of the Art Institute of Chicago.
Dinner to follow, at Italian Village.

Friday, May 26th.
Meet at 9 AM at Patisserie Toni for breakfast, followed by a visit to concrete happenings, the Wolf Vostell show at University of Chicago. Bring flyers, postcards, handouts ... let them know we were there !
At 4:30 pm we regroup at the MCA plaza for Flux/Resist. A guerilla art parade with street performances which joins the larger public protests at trump tower. Bring signs, banners, handouts, ask others to send signs to carry ...

8pm New York Correspondance school of Chicago Yearly meeting and dinner.
The berghoff restaurant.

Saturday May 26th
10am breakfast meet up at Patisserie Toni ,
12-12:30 arrive at UNUM Gallery .
Performance from 1-4? PM .
Dinner to follow at FEED.
End the evening with the Nightcap Party at Schwalbe House. Wear your favorite nightcap, bring your Ukeleles.

Sunday May 27th
12:00 -5pm ?
Fluxuspotluck
Food and performances at
6018 North Gallery

VIto Acconci, performance and video artist, who was hugely influential in the New York art world, and in the world at large, died on Thursday, April 28th in NYC.

Like many in my generation, I first became aware of his work in the early 70s through his piece, "Seedbed", in which he built a ramp in a Manhattan art gallery, and lay hidden underneath it - masturbating while visitors walked above him. I fell in love with the idea of pushing art to new limits, and the feeling of artistic freedom and liberation from the constraints of the canvas.

Seedbed by Vito Acconci

Obituary

Dada Centennial: Day of the Dead

Call for Works! Deadline Oct 29, 2016

The International Museum of Collage, Assemblage and Construction (collagemuseum.com) with the International Society of Assemblage and Collage Artists (collagist.org)  in Santa Fe, New Mexico invites you to contribute to our celebration of the 100 year Anniversary of DADA! Because The Archives are in Santa Fe, we will also be setting up our first annual Mexican Style Ofrenda (offering) to honor our artistic ancestors. This year we will be celebrating the collage/assemblage Dada artists including Kurt Schwitters, Hannah Höch, Man Ray, John Heartfield, Marcel Duchamp, Jean Arp, Max Ernst, Raoul Hausmann, etc.

The International Post-Dogmatist Group’s Office of the Postulator-General will also be holding a historic Canonization Ceremony for Master (Herr) Kurt Schwitters of Hanover at the opening!

WHAT TO SEND: We are asking you to make a collage in the spirit of Dada such as using chance operations or any other dada technique - send a Merz work - an object for the Ofrenda dedicted to one or more of the DADA artists – send an collage or assemblage homage in the style of one of the DADA artists -  Keep it smallish – 14x11 inches or smaller. Ready to hang is best.

TERMS: There are: NO FEES, NO JURY, NO RETURNS! Your contribution WILL be exhibited and will become a part of the permanent collection of the IMCAC Archives for possible use in future exhibitions and/or publications.

DOCUMENTATION: Your contribution will be exhibited beginning with the opening November 4, 2016 and continue through January 2017. The works will be on permanent exhibit online on our 2016 inventory blog under “Dada Centennial” with a possible catalog produced.

DEADLINE: Please have works in by October 29, 2016! (late works will be added to the exhibition but please be on time if possible) NO TIME TO FRET, JUST DO IT.

Send works to:

Dada Centennial: Day of the Dead
4810 West Alameda Street
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87507
Tel. 505-303-3034

Italian artist, Fulgo Silvi, features small artworks submitted from around the world, on his beard. That's right. His beard is an art gallery!

You too can be featured on Fulgor Silvi's beard! The most exclusive small gallery anywhere!

Beard Gallery Poster

Send 5 pieces, each one 5cm x 5cm to:

Fulgor Silvi
Via Pagino 1
61040 Frontone (PU)
ITALY

George Maciunas (1931–1978) was a co-founder, and the self-appointed leader of Fluxus, an international community of artists, which was especially active in the United States, Japan, and Europe during the 1960s and 1970s. Today, the Fluxus network continues to thrive in the traditions established all those years ago by Maciuanas and his contemporaries.

Fluxshop-Stationery
George Maciunas, “Fluxshop Stationery (recto)” (nd), offset, printed in black, 13 3/4 x 6 3/4 inches (The Gilbert and Lila Silverman Fluxus Collection Archives, The Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York)

Manhattan-based artist and filmmaker Jeffrey Perkins, who met Maciunas several times and has long been associated with many of Fluxus’s key figures, has been gathering research material and shooting interviews with surviving Fluxus luminaries for George, a documentary film he is producing that will chronicle the life and achievements of the avant-garde group’s legendary leader.

Full article about the project is available on HyperAllergic.com

“George,” the Maciunas Film: An Emerging Portrait of an Influential Enigma

What characteristics of an artwork serve to identify a piece as belonging to, or related to, Fluxus?

Historically many artists working in different media have related their work to Fluxus. Some of these artists belonged to a group surrounding the Lithuanian-American artist, George Maciunas, and the American artist, Dick Higgins. After the death of Maciunas, Higgins continued to promote Fluxus, eventually attracting a new generation of artists to the (non) movement, through the co-founding of an Internet mailing list—the Fluxlist. This new group of artists has continued the artistic practice of the first generation, while working towards maintaining the relevance of all generations, into the 21st century.

So what is Fluxus, and how can you know it when you see it?

The Fluxus artistic philosophy can be defined as a synthesis of four key factors that define the majority of work:

  1. Fluxus is an attitude. It is not a movement or a style.
  2. Fluxus is Intermedia. Fluxus creators like to see what happens when different media intersect. They use found and everyday objects, sounds, images, and texts to create new combinations of objects, sounds, images, and texts.
  3. Fluxus works are simple. The art is small, the texts are short, and the performances are brief.
  4. Fluxus is (usually) fun. Humor has always been an important element in Fluxus.

Fluxus artwork almost always exists in one (or more) of these three forms:

  1. Event scores
  2. Fluxkits/Fluxboxes
  3. Intermedia

Event Scores:

Event scores are similar to short musical scores or theatrical setting descriptions. Some are designed to be performed, and some are written to be read and imagined without ever actually being performed. Of those that are written to be performed, some may be designed to be performed only once and recorded (through written, photo, or video) documentation, while others are written so that they can be performed repeatedly. Associated artists who have made extensive use of event scores in their work include Yoko Ono and George Brecht. The musical compositions of John Cage and the "Happenings" of Allan Kaprow are also closely related to Fluxus event scores.

Fluxkits:

Fluxkits, also sometimes call Fluxboxes, are smallish (usually no larger than a shoe box or briefcase) objects, that are collections of other objects that hold meaning to the artist, and can be interacted with by the audience. Fluxkits have been produced as multiples in editions, and as unique, one-of-a-kind objects. Interactivity can consist of examination of the contents, rearrangement of the objects, or games in which the rules often resemble event scores. Artists who have received attention in the art-oriented mass media for their fluxkits and fluxboxes include George Maciunas (who coined the word "Fluxus"), Ay-O, and George Brecht. The first Fluxkits probably resulted from fresh interpretations of the work of dada artist, Marcel Duchamp, and have continued to influence present day Fluxus and mail artists.

Intermedia:

A third indicator of relatedness is the concept of "Intermedia". The important Fluxus artist, Dick Higgins, described Intermedia as a myriad of emerging genres that spilled across the boundaries of traditional media. In the intersections between the arts, mixed-media forms coalesced: Happenings, performance art, kinetic sculpture, and electronic theater (Higgins). Higgins suggests that Fluxus artists explore the territory that lies between art media and life media. The difficulty in using Intermedia as a determinant to identifying a particular artists or artwork as Fluxus is that it is not easy to identify what kind of objects exist in "the territory between art media and life media". However, performance art, video art, installation art, mail art, and time-based artworks are closely related even if not identified as such by either the artist or art critics.

It is safe to say that any work that closely resembles an Event Score or a Fluxkit/Fluxbox, is either Fluxus, or is closely related. It can also be argued that the combination of artistic intent (the artist states that the work is "Fluxus") with an intermedia presentation, is Fluxus.

And while I am aware of artists that believe that their work is Fluxus because they say it is, that claim, without other evidence, should be considered spurious.

Poster made by Allen Bukoff of Fluxus Midwest, after Fluxfest Chicago 2016. Allen has generously made downloadable and printable copies available on his website at,
fluxfest.org/somefluxus/SOMEFLUXUSPOSTER30x35.jpg or
fluxfest.org/somefluxus/SOMEFLUXUSPOSTERtabloid.jpg