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Fluxus and Minimalism and Me

Roots of Fluxus vs. Roots of Minimalism

Fluxus and Minimalism emerged at about the same time, and in reaction to the same tendencies in the art world. Both sensibilities evolved partly as a reaction against the post war (WWII) dogma of Abstract Expressionism. More importantly, they were both artistic revolutions against the art establishment. But there was an important difference that cannot be ignored. Whereas Fluxus had its roots in the anti-art aesthetic of Dada, Minimalism had its roots in the same milieu as the art world that it rebelled against. Inevitably, Minimalism became subsumed into that art world. Fluxus remains to this day as a small but important bastion, standing against the tyranny of artistic orthodoxy.

I like Fluxus. I create Fluxus artworks.

I like Minimalism. I create minimalist artworks.

I see myself as an anti-artist, and an artist, at the same time. And this causes me some cognitive dissonance. How does one resolve this dissonance?

There remains a core commonality in Fluxus and Minimalism, despite their differences. Both Fluxus and minimalism are meant to be accessible. Both rejected a prevailing aesthetic that was being imposed by critics, historians, academics, and a ruthlessly mercenary cabal of collectors and art dealers. Both stood out as artist-centred, and artist organized. And even though the "art stars" of Minimalism moved into the realm of art dealers and collector/market driven commercialism, the minimalist (deliberately not capitalized "m") aesthetic and life-orientation remains accessible to any artist who is drawn to it.

Two images.Vultures over Marfa Texas and red circle with nothing in it

The two works above are some of my most recent pieces, in which I've attempted to merge the anti-art ethos of Fluxus with the minimal aesthetic of Minimalism. I'm not sure if I've succeeded with my new series of works on paper, but my goal is to hang on to the minimalist aesthetic and my inherent Fluxus sensibilities.

And of course, I can never really leave the Fluxus community and the "fluxiest" aspects of Fluxus, in which Intermedia supersedes any single medium.

Allan Revich (me), throwing a pebble into each corner of the universe. Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, 2010

Fluxus and Minimalism emerged at about the same time, and in reaction to the same tendencies in the art world. Both sensibilities evolved partly as a reaction against the prevailing orthodoxy of the gallery/collector oriented art world.

This article is not about the 21st century minimalist lifestyle.

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Published on Categories Artists, Fluxus, Fluxus HistoryTags , ,

About Allan Revich

Allan Revich is a Toronto artist and writer. His work has appeared in numerous publications, in international exhibitions, and on many websites. He is active in the international Fluxus community. He currently writes poetry, creates visual poems, and works with photography. His work includes Web-based art, mixed media art, and mail art. His books, Headline Haiku 2006, Headline Haiku 2007, and Fluxus Vision are available internationally on Amazon.com and its affiliates, as his most recent collection of poems, "Flux You!".

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