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It sometimes seems to me that photography has been the forgotten child of Fluxus over the years. I suppose it is not hard to understand why... there has not been a lot of photographic work that has been identified as being explicitly "Fluxus". Unlike video, which lemds itself so readily to Fluxus interpretations, the lines between Intermedia and multimedia are ill-defined and lurry at best, static photographs find their place most often as either "documentation" or "fine art". read more

Fluxfest in New York!

While (not yet) “officially” a Fluxfest, the weekend beginning on Thursday, April 15, 2010 is shaping up to be another exciting Festival of Fluxus in New York City. Here, courtesy of my favorite Fluxus impresario, Keith Buchholz is the itinerary so far. Be there… or be somewhere else! read more

September 10, 2009 marked the opening of an installation of staggering scope at The Emily Harvey Foundation Gallery in New York City. An American artist residing in Paris, Matthew Rose, invited hundreds of artists from around the globe to participate in the creation of an unbound book on the theme of "death". Appropriately enough, the exhibition and associated book, were titled, A Book About Death. Each participant was asked to submit an edition of 500 postcards, which were to be exhibited, and then freely distributed at the September 10th opening. The remaining postcards would remain availble for free distribution at the gallery until the show closed on September 22nd. read more

In this chapter we learn that Fluxus is actually dead. We will also learn that Fluxus is alive and well and living in... everywhere.

I don't think many Living Fluxus artists really believe that they (we) are part of a magical posthumous George Maciunas Fluxus Group. From what I have heard and read, George was fond of including and excluding people in "his" Fluxus as he saw fit... so who knows what he would have done with us? Maybe he would have loved us, and maybe he would have decided that we were not worth caring about. I believe that many artists, writers, historians, etc. have worked around this issue by accepting the two-part or three-part (Part 1 = GM; Part 2 = Worked with GM and kept working; Part 3 = Working today within the Fluxus meme) idea that I proposed in the first note I posted. It is an attempt to be respectful of the Fluxus One era, and of George Maciunas, who was unarguably the keystone to that era -- while acknowledging (what to me is an equally inarguable reality) that Fluxus continued on/continues on unabated after he died. read more

I suspect that there will always be some confusion about the "life-status" of Fluxus. That is because there are really two parts to it. During Maciunas' lifetime the two parts were completely intertwined. After his death, I think that part of Fluxus died with him...but a vital and important part continued on without him. That continuing part is not ... Read moresome sort of "new" fluxus, or "neo-Fluxus". It IS Fluxus. It may be Post-Maciunas Fluxus, but it is still Fluxus. read more

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