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About Allan Revich

Allan Revich is a Toronto artist and writer. His work has appeared in numerous publications, in international exhibitions, and on many websites. He is active in the international Fluxus community. He currently writes poetry, creates visual poems, and works with photography. His work includes Web-based art, mixed media art, and mail art. His books, Headline Haiku 2006, Headline Haiku 2007, and Fluxus Vision are available internationally on Amazon.com and its affiliates, as his most recent collection of poems, "Flux You!".

Maybe you think Fluxus still lives and you would like to textualise its progress and historical relevance - should you be obliged to read everything written and also look at each and every one of Peter Moore's 350,000 photographs?

~ Larry Miller

------------- and;

...there are some points in common among most Fluxworks:
1 internationalism, 2 experimentalism and iconoclasm, 3 intermedia, 4 minimalism or concentration, 5 an attempted resolution of the art/life dichotomy, 6 implicativeness, 7 play or gags, 8 ephemerality, and 9 specificity.

[...]

Every so often there is a new upsurge of interest in Fluxus. At such times those who were not in the original Fluxus group will present themselves as Fluxartists. The best way of verifying their claims is, of course, to match them against the criteria. The more criteria they match, the more right they have to be included as Fluxartists in projects.

~ Dick Higgins

Free Digital Edition of the Fluxus Reader, edited by Ken Friedman
http://www.artandeducation.net/announcement/fluxus-reader-free-digital-edition/

Or, What I Learned That Fluxus Was/Is/Isn't/Might be/Should be/Could be

We could start with Dada. Some people have called Fluxus "neodada". Some have called contemporary Fluxus neodada. Those people are wrong. So we won't start with Dada.

Let's start instead with John Cage. John Cage was not a Fluxus artist, and he had nothing directly to do with the founding of Fluxus. But he had one really cool idea that made Fluxus (and most art of every kind after his idea) possible. Cage realized that music (he was a composer) was all just sound waves in air. It wasn't flutes, or pianos, or violins, or treble clefs and bass clefs, or 4/4 time or 3/4 time. It was just waves moving through the atmosphere at frequencies audible to the human ear. Most music was composed so that the composer or musician's organization of the sound waves would bring pleasure to most of the composer/musician's cultural contemporaries. But it didn't have to. A composer, or musician, or artist could organize sound waves in whatever way they wanted, and they could use whatever tools they wanted to, to organize those sound waves. It wasn't a great leap from there to the idea that visual art was subject to the same thinking. All visual art consisted of marks and forms, organized on surfaces or in space, and any artist could choose how to organize their marks and forms, and what tools to use to do so.

In the early 1960s a group of artists, led mostly by George Maciunas and Dick Higgins coalesced around the idea of Intermedia. The idea that art created in the spaces in which different media intersect would be more interesting than art confined to any single medium. George organized the first ever Fluxus Festival in Wiesbaden, Germany in 1962. For more than a decade after that ,the core group of artists were bound together by a relatively held-in-common artistic vision. The first manifesto was published by Maciunas, and subsequent manifestos of varying degrees of influence were published subsequently. The salient point is that, at least until the death of Maciunas in 1978, the IDEA of Fluxus and the PEOPLE of Fluxus were one and the same.

Then things get complicated...

As long as the idea and the people were one and the same, nobody had to think much about what would happen to the idea, once the people moved on to other things, places, or states-of-being. But Fluxus turned out to be a pretty darned good idea, and it was an especially good idea for artists that were either interested in working in intermedia, and artists who were not particularly interested in participating in the machinations of the Art World and its hyperactive commercialism, power politics, and money games.

Inevitably, a new cohort of artists emerged who had either loose affiliations, or no affiliation with the original group of Fluxus artists, but were deeply committed to the Fluxus ideas and ideals. Many of these artists consider their association to the Fluxus ideas to be deep enough to refer to themselves as "Fluxus artists". These artists often point to statements by the original Fluxus artists, that make it very clear that they never considered Fluxus to be an art movement in the traditional art-historical sense, or as a "closed group" of artists whose participation in Fluxus required consent. In the words of Fluxus artist and historian, Ken Friedman,

"Dick [Higgins] explicitly rejected a notion that limited Fluxus to a specific group of people who came together at a specific time and place. Dick wrote, “Fluxus is not a moment in history, or an art movement. Fluxus is a way of doing things, a tradition, and a way of life and death.” " http://www.iade.pt/designist/issues/001_07.html

Sadly, with the passage of time, it seems that some of the early Fluxus artists, perhaps feeling insecure about their own art-historical legacies, have taken to rewriting history: Doing so in a way that is simultaneously more favourable to the seriously moneyed art collector class, and to their perceived legacies. Seems, it turns out, that being part of an important art history movement pays higher dividends, than being an artist in the dwindling dusk of a lifetime, with nothing of consequence to show besides those spring days. In turn, this has led to a rather pathetic withdraw of support for the very artists most interested in preserving and honoring the legacy and work of the founding group of Fluxus artists.

Personally, I believe that the work and ideas of the leading Fluxus artists of the 1960s will easily withstand the tests of time. The artists who were footnotes then, will still be footnotes later. I also believe that the best way to be more than a footnote, would be for the surviving early Fluxus artists to embrace and participate in the new Fluxfests with the current generation of Fluxus artists. And those of us in that current generation, what of our artistic legacy? Most of us are too busy creating interesting, new, Fluxus artworks to worry about it!

PS: A HUGE shoutout to Yoko Ono is due here. Not only was she one of the most interesting and influential original Fluxus artists but she continues to support Fluxus Art and artists past, present, and future.

THE CAVELLINI FESTIVAL IN NYC
3 day celebration of Guglielmo Achille Cavellini Nov. 14 to 16 to
celebrate GAC's centennial 1914-2014
cavellini-NYC-sticker
Friday night November 14
530 pm to 730 pm

Reception at Museum of Modern Art library to see their mailings received
from Cavellini and to celebrate him and to look at their current mail art
historical show called "Analog Network."
Museum of Modern Art, Cullman Education Building, 4 W 54 St., New York.

Saturday November 15
10 am

Meet and go to the various museums around town and unfurl a Cavellini
1914-2014 banner for the purposes of self-historification.
Meet at Guggenheim Museum at 10 am.

12 to 2 pm

Richard L. Feigen & Co. viewing of "Ray Johnson's Art World" exhibition
with their archivist, Diana Bowers.
34 E 69th St, New York, NY.

3 to 5pm

Lynch Tham, a gallery on the Lower East Side presents a centennial
exhibition of works of Cavellini from his estate and some performances.
175 Rivington Street, New York, NY.

6-10 pm

Whitebox Art Center Lower East Side for a mail art show in honor of GAC.
Opening, performances and poetry readings.
329 Broome Street, New York, NY.


Whitebox and Lynch Tham Performance Lineup:
Performances by:
Mark Bloch | Britta Wheeler as Belinda Powell | William Evertson from
Easthampton, Connecticut Giovanni and Renatta Strada from Ravenna, Italy |
Pasha Radetzki from the Republic of Belarus

Poetry by
Valery Oisteanu | Steve Dalachinsky | Yuko Otomo | Ron Kolm | Bonny Finberg
 Jeffrey Cyphers Wright | Allan Graubard

Music by
Antonello Parisi (piano rhodes) with Michael Gam (bass) and Julieta
Eugenio (tenor sax)

Video by
Richard Kostelanetz | Galeazzo Nardini and the Italian Museum | Jennifer
Weigel
Guglielmo Achille Cavellini and others

Sunday November 16

9:30 am New York Correspondence Brunch Meeting in honor of Cavellini and
Ray Johnson and also Buster Cleveland, John Evans, Dick Higgins, David
Cole, Fernand Barbot, Carlo Pittore and other late New York mail artists
at Katz's Deli.
205 E. Houston St, New York, NY.



3 day celebration of Cavellini Nov. 14 to 16 to celebrate GAC 1914-2014.
Organized by Mark Bloch

IT'S HAPPENING
FLUXFEST CHICAGO
FEB 21 -24

Feb 21 - Thurs evening
Mail Art Exhibit
School of the Art Institute Library
Wabash Ave

Feb 22 -Friday
Performances @ The Defibulator
12-5

Feb 23 Saturday
Chicago Cultural Center
Michigan Ave between Washington & Randolph St
Performances
Mail Art 0- Film Fest
12-5

6PM Dinner at The Berghoff

Feb 24 Sunday
6018 Gallery
6018 N Kenmore
Mail Art Exhibit and Final Get together

Start making your plans for the works you want to perform
notify your friends and family and enemies
FLUXFEST CHICAGO IS HAPPENING!!!

Twelve12project

To occur simultaneously worldwide at 12/12/12/12/12  (12:12 PM on December 12, 2012)

The goal is to get as many people on the planet as possible to create something for one minute at the same time - on 12 December 2012 at 12:12 (12/12/12/12/12)! To allow for some flexibility for more people to participate, your minute of creation can be in the am (00:12) or pm (12:12), but let's make it be Eastern Time Zone - a New York Minute (GMT - 5 Hours) so we are all creating at the same two minutes on earth.

Draw something, write a song, improvise a piece of music, take a picture (or many pictures), write a poem, create a recipe - use your imagination...but make sure that you limit your work to only that one minute as a way to shape, guide and limit this project.
The act of a simultaneous moment of creation is the goal but, if you would like to share your work, please upload it to this site (make sure to record any performing arts) - that's it!
Create!

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Twelve12project/199529353517519

ReSite is an assembling publication where pages have an element of audience participation or interaction. ReSite is part of the tradition of Fluxus editions where anyone can perform a Fluxus action or score. In addition to this performance-based approach, ReSite taps into the rich tradition of the avant-garde with contributions of manifestos and documentation of art actions.

Call for submissions to ReSite
Send 40 copies size 21cm x14.8cm (A5). Please leave 2cms on the left hand side for binding. Works can be double sided and can be more than one page. Copies should be flat and landscape format. Pages will be wire-bound. ReSite is an on going project. Each issue holds 20 contributions. Copy sent to all.

Send to: Field Study, P0 Box 1838 Geelong, VIC 3220 Australia

Printed Matter presents the seventh annual NY Art Book Fair, from September 28 to 30, at MoMA PS1, Long Island City, Queens. A preview will be held on the evening of Thursday, September 27.

http://nyartbookfair.com/about

Over 15,000 artists, book buyers, collectors, dealers, curators, independent publishers, and other enthusiasts attended the NY Art Book Fair in 2011.

Hours and Location
The NY Art Book Fair is free and open to the public.

Preview: Thursday, September 27, 6–9 pm
Friday, September 28, 12 pm–7 pm
Saturday, September 29, 11 am–9 pm
Sunday, September 30, 11 am–7 pm

MoMA PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue at 46th Avenue
Long Island City, NY (map)

With the hype surrounding the Cindy Sherman blockbuster retrospective on the 6th floor, which critics have almost unanimously praised, I was surprised to find that the most invigorating, exciting and generally mind-blowing exhibition at MoMA right now is Exquisite Corpses: Drawing and Disfiguration, a small drawing show on the third floor.

Proving the continued importance and relevance of Surrealist art, Exquisite Corpses demonstrates that exhibitions do not have to be the biggest or display the hottest contemporary artist to be invigorating. These works easily delve into important artistic issues about the representation of not only the human figure but also the thoughts, emotions, sexuality and experiences contained within it.

The exquisite corpse drawings of the Surrealists were basically an artistic game that invited different artists to take turns drawing a part of the body until it is complete. The result distorts and twists the figure into something I think can be more psychologically true to the human form than academic figure drawing. The works in Exquisite Corpses range from original Surrealist pieces from the 1920s to later work by Georges Bataille, Louise Bourgeoise, Jackson Pollock and contemporary artists such as George Condo and Marcel Dzarma.

Full article on Hyperallergic.com

Cadavre Exquis with Yves Tanguy, Joan Miró, Max Morise, and Man Ray, "Nude" (1926-27), composite drawing of ink, pencil, and colored pencil on paper (via moma.org)

1

 

Museum of Contemporary
Art Tokyo

 A-Yo image  

 

Ay-O: Over the Rainbow Once More
4 February–6 May 2012

Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo
4-1-1 Miyoshi, Koto-ku
Tokyo 135-0022 Japan

www.mot-art-museum.jp 

Ay-O, "My 192 Friends," 2011. 
Ay-O: Over the Rainbow Once More 

Discover the vibrant world of Ay-O through this retrospective of his work, covering his entire career, from his early works to the present day.

Born in Ibaraki Prefecture in 1931, Ay-O, together with Masuo Ikeda and others, was active in the Demokrato Artists Association during the fifties, attracting notice for his brightly-colored oil paintings. In 1958 he moved to New York, where he used tangible objects to try to create dialogues with the world that can be perceived through the senses, resulting in his 'finger boxes', in which a finger is inserted into a hole in the side of a box to feel the material hidden inside, installation works that incorporate their surrounding environment, etc., going beyond the confines of the painting to produce works that appeal to the five senses. During the sixties, when everyday things or actions were translated into art, Ay-O received attention for his pioneering installations that he called 'environments'. As a member of the Fluxus movement, which went beyond the narrow divisions of genre to include musicians, poets and artists, its activities extending to performances and printed works to establish the foundations of today's diversity of art, he worked with such people as Yoko Ono and Nam June Paik. Finally, he rebelled against the concept of creating works consisting of lines, instead filling his motifs with the colors of the spectrum, from red to purple, giving birth to his 'rainbow' works, becoming famous throughout the world as the 'rainbow artist' subsequent to his exhibition at the 1966 Venice Biennale. Ay-O's struggle with the rainbow was expressed in a variety of genres including prints, paintings and installations, and still continues to the present day. This is the largest-ever exhibition to be held of his work, presenting numerous paintings from the rainbow series, an interactive installation that people are invited to appreciate through touch, a new work that is 30 meters in length and contains a rainbow consisting of 192 colors, a 300 meters long banner that was suspended from the Eiffel Tower in 1987 and recordings of his performance works. The gallery will overflow with Ay-O's optimistic world.

Curator:
Mihoko Nishikawa (Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo)

Organized by:
Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture, Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo
The Yomiuri Shimbun
The Japan Association of Art Museums

Exhibition Catalogue:
To be published in March 2012.
New and past text by Ay-O
English-Japanese bilingual

Press Contact:
Mutsu Yoshikawa
m-yoshikawa@mot-art.jp

Reiko Noguchi
r-noguchi@mot-art.jp
T +81(0)3-5245-1134(Direct)
F +81(0)3-5245-1141

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