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About Allan Revich

Allan Revich is a Toronto artist and writer. His work has appeared in numerous publications, in international exhibitions, and on many websites. He is active in the international Fluxus community. He currently writes poetry, creates visual poems, and works with photography. His work includes Web-based art, mixed media art, and mail art. His books, Headline Haiku 2006, Headline Haiku 2007, and Fluxus Vision are available internationally on and its affiliates, as his most recent collection of poems, "Flux You!".

Artist and musician, La Monte Young, has been to avant garde music what Ray Johnson was to Mail Art. He was influenced by John Cage, but went on to create his own highly influential oeuvre.

When he wrote Trio for Strings, he was still a starving artist eating mustard sandwiches to survive. According to Young [he] “bought the bread and stole the mustard," On September 3, 2015 Young will present the original full-length version of Trio for Strings at Dia. He considers it to be a world premiere, as when it premiered 57 years ago he agreed to shorten it for presentation. A decision he regrets.

Young isn’t interested in temporal popularity; he believes his music will be exalted, because it leads toward enlightenment.

Photograph of La Monte Young
Photo: John Cliett/© Pandit Pran Nath 1987/Courtesy of The Pandit Pran Nath Musical Composition Trust

La Monte Young has a different relationship to time from the rest of us. His music goes on for a long time — that’s objectively true, and it feels even longer if, like many people, you find it boring. He’s credited as the vastly influential father of minimalism because when he was 22, in 1958, he wrote the first piece that held notes for a long period, suspended in air to allow examination and contemplation. His best-known work, The Well-Tuned Piano, is a solo performance that has grown in length from three and a half hours to five to, last time he played it, nearly six and a half. (It would have been longer, but he rushed a few parts.) When he was young, Young shocked Karlheinz Stockhausen by strolling in two hours late for the intimidating composer’s morning composition class in Darmstadt, Germany. For some time, Young lived on a weekly cycle of five 33.6-hour days. Lately, he stays awake for 24 hours, and then rests for 24.

Link to full article by


La Monte Young talks about his Fluxus connections:

Thu Jun 04, 2015 - Mon Jun 08, 2015

Fluxus artist Picasso Gaglione will present an exhibition of his flux box sets which  he is generously donating for sale to benefit mobius.  Each box comprises all aspects of his artwork: rubber stamps, artist stamps, book design, communication and construction but are never formulaic or repetitious. They are treasure boxes of art secrets revealed.


Picasso Gaglione: The Art of the Flux Box @mobius
Picasso Gaglione: The Art of the Flux Box @mobius

Exhibition: June 4-7 (gallery hours tbd)
Monday June 8th:
6-8pm :: exhibition
7:32pm :: Performance: Domel - Gaglione
Post-performance :: all invited to flux dinner (going dutch at nearby restaurant

NOTE: All Fluxus performance artists are welcome to perform at this venue on June 8th!

Fluxus Digital Collection Launch

April 7, 2015—We are pleased to announce the launch of The Fluxus Digital Collection. This online archive gathers an eclectic range of artworks by one of the most important movements of the twentieth century. Global in scope, Fluxus members moved between the USA, Europe, East Asia, and elsewhere. They worked across and between traditional media, opting for ephemeral materials, participatory approaches, and playful humor.

The collection includes digital tools that make interactive objects and text-based works available to viewers—many of which have not been read, seen, or heard outside of select archives. With technical tools that include 3-D modeling, digital scanning, photography, and film, the Fluxus Digital Collection gives worldwide access to scholars, teachers, students, and art-lovers.

“Video pioneer Nam June Paik organized the first art exhibition on the World Wide Web in 1994,” explains Fluxus artist and collection donor Ken Friedman. “Since then, Fluxus artists and composers have had a durable presence of event scores, images, documents, web sites, exhibitions, publications, and more. Some vanished when links broke and web sites disappeared. Others continue to overcome the limits of fragile artifacts that museums preserve by protecting them from people. The Fluxus Digital Collection brings works back to life, returning them to the world where they belong with a future as lively as the past.”

The University of Iowa Special Collections houses a trove of yet-to-be processed Fluxus art, writing, and correspondence. The Fluxus Digital Collection will continue to grow as we add new content.

Artists featured in the collection include: John Cage, Dick Higgins, George Brecht, Robert Watts, Ken Friedman, George Maciunas, Yoko Ono, Joseph Beuys, Milan Knížák, Ben Vautier, Nam June Paik, Frank Zappa, Robert Filliou, Mieko Shiomi, Shigeko Kubota, Ben Patterson, Dieter Roth, Eric Andersen, Takehisa Kosugi, Ay-O, and others.

Supporting Partners
The University of Iowa
Digital Studio for Public Arts & Humanities
UI Library Digital Research & Publishing

Special Collections
For more information, contact:
Dr. Stephen Voyce
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Digital Studio for the Public Humanities
University of Iowa
T: 1.319.333.1923

Fluxus was an international group of thinkers, artists, composers, performers and designers that first networked themselves together in the late 1950s, then became a performance collective when they took their name in 1962, then a way of working with time and materials and eventually an art movement creating work in several dimensions and media that lasted from the early 60s through the late 70s and beyond on three continents, blazing the aesthetic trails that were to define the next half century of art history. They shattered old aesthetic boundaries and explored new ones, while grappling internally with their communal identity, under the guidance of their own conflicting, shifting, and morphing opinions of who they were and what they were up to as both a group and as individuals, without clear or firm parameters of what criteria might define their association. They ebbed and flowed as a collective, against the odds, disappearing and reemerging like a simple but mysterious prop in a magician’s routine, through schisms, chasms, reorganizations and excommunications.

Many members are now gone, some deceased, some scurrying away quietly in the night under the radar with others lionized in enormous spotlights in life and in death, with the final few, more than a handful, still amongst us today, creating dynamic new senior citizen fluxworks or as in the case of the youngest members, now in very late middle age, finally enjoying their occasional new-found status as Old Masters, dog-tired “concept” artists who taught a very old art world a few new tricks.

Fluxus has always defied traditions by establishing new ones, transcended geographical limitations by staking out unfamiliar territory, and most importantly by virtually fusing together in deceptively simple ways all the medium-based approaches of the middle 20th Century, creating entirely new genres that we take for granted today out of the old ones as a replacement status quo for a New Millennium. Fluxus participants were among the first to embrace a “do-it-yourself” mindset, exposing process as superior to end products while producing startling and surprising results, circumventing existing institutions by utilizing everyday objects, approaches and activities to successfully blur boundaries between art and life.

George Maciunas, a made-to-order autocrat for his times and the group’s Lithuanian-born gatekeeper and visionary czar, instigated and organized art experiences as a collaborative social process, breathing new creativity into an established art world that slowly came to accept the group’s contributions not only as valid but as important and essential to the changing times. Maciunas and the other Fluxus artists he attempted to control, individually and en masse, created thought-provoking works that turned an elusive, ephemeral approach to shaping ethereal forces of anarchy into playful manifestations of art “product” existing in two and three dimensions or as events in time, captured and frozen by their instructions and posters or in beautiful photographs or by-products. They created art that resonated like poems for their times or like zen koans producing a series of aftershocks more akin to spiritual experiences or thrills had in any amusement park or both than to the conventional aesthetics and other familiar goings on in the staid commercial art world. They delivered work that goosed their audiences or tickled onlookers with subtle punch lines that forced their creative contemporaries and the public at large to approach life in the decades since, whether they knew it or not, with a freshly minted Fluxus attitude of their own that they themselves slyly assumed they had invented.

But Fluxus had bubbled up from within and rendered an art world constitutionally unprepared to assimilate it, defenseless against its playful reach. Fifty years ago, Fluxus began to prepare the fertile ground required for a completely transformed art world to emerge in another century and they did so elegantly, admirably and without much hype or fanfare.

Here's the skinny on where you'll find it happening.

Fluxfest Chicago 2015 Schedule of Events:

Thursday, Feb 19, 4-8pm: "Kiss" reception (secret location, call 314-276-4802 Day of Event for details)
Friday, Feb 20, 12-5pm: Chicago Fluxus Day (Chicago Cultural Center)
Friday, Feb 20, 7-?pm: New York Correspondance Dinner of Chicago (Berghoff's)
Saturday, Feb 21, 7-10pm: A Flux -Evening, (6018 North)
Sunday, Feb 22, 12-5pm: Listening party, (6018 North)

Maybe you think Fluxus still lives and you would like to textualise its progress and historical relevance - should you be obliged to read everything written and also look at each and every one of Peter Moore's 350,000 photographs?

~ Larry Miller

------------- and;

...there are some points in common among most Fluxworks:
1 internationalism, 2 experimentalism and iconoclasm, 3 intermedia, 4 minimalism or concentration, 5 an attempted resolution of the art/life dichotomy, 6 implicativeness, 7 play or gags, 8 ephemerality, and 9 specificity.


Every so often there is a new upsurge of interest in Fluxus. At such times those who were not in the original Fluxus group will present themselves as Fluxartists. The best way of verifying their claims is, of course, to match them against the criteria. The more criteria they match, the more right they have to be included as Fluxartists in projects.

~ Dick Higgins

Free Digital Edition of the Fluxus Reader, edited by Ken Friedman

Or, What I Learned That Fluxus Was/Is/Isn't/Might be/Should be/Could be

We could start with Dada. Some people have called Fluxus "neodada". Some have called contemporary Fluxus neodada. Those people are wrong. So we won't start with Dada.

Let's start instead with John Cage. John Cage was not a Fluxus artist, and he had nothing directly to do with the founding of Fluxus. But he had one really cool idea that made Fluxus (and most art of every kind after his idea) possible. Cage realized that music (he was a composer) was all just sound waves in air. It wasn't flutes, or pianos, or violins, or treble clefs and bass clefs, or 4/4 time or 3/4 time. It was just waves moving through the atmosphere at frequencies audible to the human ear. Most music was composed so that the composer or musician's organization of the sound waves would bring pleasure to most of the composer/musician's cultural contemporaries. But it didn't have to. A composer, or musician, or artist could organize sound waves in whatever way they wanted, and they could use whatever tools they wanted to, to organize those sound waves. It wasn't a great leap from there to the idea that visual art was subject to the same thinking. All visual art consisted of marks and forms, organized on surfaces or in space, and any artist could choose how to organize their marks and forms, and what tools to use to do so.

In the early 1960s a group of artists, led mostly by George Maciunas and Dick Higgins coalesced around the idea of Intermedia. The idea that art created in the spaces in which different media intersect would be more interesting than art confined to any single medium. George organized the first ever Fluxus Festival in Wiesbaden, Germany in 1962. For more than a decade after that ,the core group of artists were bound together by a relatively held-in-common artistic vision. The first manifesto was published by Maciunas, and subsequent manifestos of varying degrees of influence were published subsequently. The salient point is that, at least until the death of Maciunas in 1978, the IDEA of Fluxus and the PEOPLE of Fluxus were one and the same.

Then things get complicated...

As long as the idea and the people were one and the same, nobody had to think much about what would happen to the idea, once the people moved on to other things, places, or states-of-being. But Fluxus turned out to be a pretty darned good idea, and it was an especially good idea for artists that were either interested in working in intermedia, and artists who were not particularly interested in participating in the machinations of the Art World and its hyperactive commercialism, power politics, and money games.

Inevitably, a new cohort of artists emerged who had either loose affiliations, or no affiliation with the original group of Fluxus artists, but were deeply committed to the Fluxus ideas and ideals. Many of these artists consider their association to the Fluxus ideas to be deep enough to refer to themselves as "Fluxus artists". These artists often point to statements by the original Fluxus artists, that make it very clear that they never considered Fluxus to be an art movement in the traditional art-historical sense, or as a "closed group" of artists whose participation in Fluxus required consent. In the words of Fluxus artist and historian, Ken Friedman,

"Dick [Higgins] explicitly rejected a notion that limited Fluxus to a specific group of people who came together at a specific time and place. Dick wrote, “Fluxus is not a moment in history, or an art movement. Fluxus is a way of doing things, a tradition, and a way of life and death.” "

Sadly, with the passage of time, it seems that some of the early Fluxus artists, perhaps feeling insecure about their own art-historical legacies, have taken to rewriting history: Doing so in a way that is simultaneously more favourable to the seriously moneyed art collector class, and to their perceived legacies. Seems, it turns out, that being part of an important art history movement pays higher dividends, than being an artist in the dwindling dusk of a lifetime, with nothing of consequence to show besides those spring days. In turn, this has led to a rather pathetic withdraw of support for the very artists most interested in preserving and honoring the legacy and work of the founding group of Fluxus artists.

Personally, I believe that the work and ideas of the leading Fluxus artists of the 1960s will easily withstand the tests of time. The artists who were footnotes then, will still be footnotes later. I also believe that the best way to be more than a footnote, would be for the surviving early Fluxus artists to embrace and participate in the new Fluxfests with the current generation of Fluxus artists. And those of us in that current generation, what of our artistic legacy? Most of us are too busy creating interesting, new, Fluxus artworks to worry about it!

PS: A HUGE shoutout to Yoko Ono is due here. Not only was she one of the most interesting and influential original Fluxus artists but she continues to support Fluxus Art and artists past, present, and future.

3 day celebration of Guglielmo Achille Cavellini Nov. 14 to 16 to
celebrate GAC's centennial 1914-2014
Friday night November 14
530 pm to 730 pm

Reception at Museum of Modern Art library to see their mailings received
from Cavellini and to celebrate him and to look at their current mail art
historical show called "Analog Network."
Museum of Modern Art, Cullman Education Building, 4 W 54 St., New York.

Saturday November 15
10 am

Meet and go to the various museums around town and unfurl a Cavellini
1914-2014 banner for the purposes of self-historification.
Meet at Guggenheim Museum at 10 am.

12 to 2 pm

Richard L. Feigen & Co. viewing of "Ray Johnson's Art World" exhibition
with their archivist, Diana Bowers.
34 E 69th St, New York, NY.

3 to 5pm

Lynch Tham, a gallery on the Lower East Side presents a centennial
exhibition of works of Cavellini from his estate and some performances.
175 Rivington Street, New York, NY.

6-10 pm

Whitebox Art Center Lower East Side for a mail art show in honor of GAC.
Opening, performances and poetry readings.
329 Broome Street, New York, NY.

Whitebox and Lynch Tham Performance Lineup:
Performances by:
Mark Bloch | Britta Wheeler as Belinda Powell | William Evertson from
Easthampton, Connecticut Giovanni and Renatta Strada from Ravenna, Italy |
Pasha Radetzki from the Republic of Belarus

Poetry by
Valery Oisteanu | Steve Dalachinsky | Yuko Otomo | Ron Kolm | Bonny Finberg
 Jeffrey Cyphers Wright | Allan Graubard

Music by
Antonello Parisi (piano rhodes) with Michael Gam (bass) and Julieta
Eugenio (tenor sax)

Video by
Richard Kostelanetz | Galeazzo Nardini and the Italian Museum | Jennifer
Guglielmo Achille Cavellini and others

Sunday November 16

9:30 am New York Correspondence Brunch Meeting in honor of Cavellini and
Ray Johnson and also Buster Cleveland, John Evans, Dick Higgins, David
Cole, Fernand Barbot, Carlo Pittore and other late New York mail artists
at Katz's Deli.
205 E. Houston St, New York, NY.

3 day celebration of Cavellini Nov. 14 to 16 to celebrate GAC 1914-2014.
Organized by Mark Bloch

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